Does landlord have a duty to mitigate damages if tenant breaches lease?

If you are a landlord in New York, you may – or may not – be responsible for mitigating damages that result from a breach of the lease.

Generally, a non-breaching party to a contract has a duty to mitigate damages resulting from another party’s breach of contract. For example, imagine that a construction company enters into a contract to buy building materials from a manufacturer. If the manufacturer breaches the contract by failing to provide the building materials, the construction company will not be able to complete the building, and may not be paid for the project. Under traditional contract rules, the construction company has a duty to attempt to acquire the materials from another manufacturer. The construction company may not sue the manufacturer for all of the money it lost as a consequence of failing to complete the project unless it at least made an effort to replace the materials, by, for example, buying the materials from another manufacturer. Even if successful in replacing the materials, the construction company may sue the manufacturer for any additional costs it took on in search of those replacement materials.

Landlord tenant law sometimes imposes a similar duty upon a landlord in the event that a tenant breaches a lease by, for instance, moving out before the end of the lease term. Many jurisdictions would require a landlord in this position to at least attempt to rent the property to another tenant. If successful, the landlord will have avoided some of the financial losses that would have occurred had the property remained vacant until the end of the lease term. However, in other jurisdictions, no such duty is imposed upon landlords. In those cases, if a tenant breaches a lease by moving out, a landlord may wait until the end of the lease term, and then sue the tenant for the entire amount of rent still outstanding under the lease, without making any attempt to find a replacement tenant.

What kind of jurisdiction is New York? Surprisingly, it is both. Although most courts agree that commercial landlords have no duty to mitigate their damages (that is, they have no duty to find replacement tenants), there is much disagreement – and confusion – between the courts about whether residential landlords have such a duty. For the foreseeable future – that is, until a higher court takes an unambiguous position on this issue – case law in the different counties determines whether the duty applies to any given landlord.

If you are a landlord or tenant, and have any questions about how the law applies to your property or lease, please feel free to call (516) 858-2620 to speak with a Landlord Tenant Attorney.

 

*Contributions to the research and preparation for this blog were made by Jason Mays, J.D.(awaiting admission in NYS)

Evicting a Problem Tenant

On May 3, 2010, in Landlord-Tenant, by Robbie L. Vaughn, Esq.

Evicting Problem Tenants

Evicting Problem Tenants

So, you have had it with your tenant and want them out. Evicting a tenant can be a tricky and lengthy process.

The following is very general overview of the eviction process*:

1. Determine the status of the person occupying the premises (i.e. tenant);

2.Determine what grounds you have to evict (i.e. breach of lease terms);

3. Determine the type of action you can bring (i.e. non-payment);

4. Determine what notice must legally be given to the occupant (i.e.  3 days);

5. Give the occupant the appropriate notice in the appropriate manner;

6. File the appropriate petition in the appropriate court;

7. Have the tenant appropriately “served”;

8. File proof of service with the court;

9. Wait for tenant to answer or default;

10. Go to court!

*The above is merely an overview of the eviction process.  Additional or different steps may be required to evict a particular tenant.

If you are having trouble evicting a tenant we may be able to help you evict them so that you can re-let your apartment, sell your home, etc. We were recently successful in using the landlord-tenant court to get a tenant, that had not paid rent for over eight (8) months, out of a landlord’s apartment building in a matter of days.

Nassu County Eviction Attorney

As always, the Law Firm of Vaughn, Weber & Prakope, PLLC is here to assist you.  We are conveniently located in the heart of Nassau County, Long Island.

We proudly assist residents of Long Island: Nassau county, Suffolk county, New York City: Queens, Brooklyn, Bronx, Staten Island, and Manhattan with their landlord tenant matters.

Call (516) 858-2620 to arrange a FREE consultation with a Landlord Tenant attorney!

The information you obtain at this site is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. You should consult an attorney for individual advice regarding your own situation. This website is Attorney Advertising. It does not form an attorney-client relationship. We are a debt relief agency and a law firm that helps people file for bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code – Title 11. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome. Proudly assisting residents of Long Island, Nassau county, Suffolk county, New York City, Queens, Brooklyn, Bronx, Staten Island, Manhattan